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Rivers and Streams Videos and Webinars

Living Soil Film

Living Soil Film

Our soils support 95 percent of all food production, and by 2060, our soils will be asked to give us as much food as we have consumed in the last 500 years. 60-minute documentary featuring innovative farmers and soil health experts from across the nation. The societal and environmental costs of soil loss and degradation in the U.S. are now estimated to be as high as $85 billion every single year. It’s time we changed everything we thought we knew about soil.

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“One Stick at a Time” in pursuit of climate adaptations for a more sustainable future

“One Stick at a Time” in pursuit of climate adaptations for a more sustainable future

This film follows land managers in the Methow Valley, Washington for over a year, from forests to rivers, from fires to snowfall, from beaver capture to release as they try to come to grips with the impacts of climate change and the possible adaptation options right in front of them. It is a conversation starter for answering the question "What can I do?" With support from the best climate experts in the Northwest, it is a chance for each of us to think about what our landscapes will be like ten decades from now. It is a nudge to start today to make our surroundings better than they would be if we did nothing. The film was conceived as part of the 10 Decades Project, the goal of which is to inspire thousands of us to take measurable, concrete steps for climate adaptation in every area for which we are responsible.

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"Cold Water and Hardtack" Episode 308 | Tennessee Uncharted

"Cold Water and Hardtack" Episode 308 | Tennessee Uncharted

Host Erick Baker and the Tennessee Uncharted crew take us on an adventure that looks to the future of water health and species diversity in Tennessee and pays tribute to the past in a Civil War reenactment.

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We take care of our Natural Resources in Haywood County NC

We take care of our Natural Resources in Haywood County NC

Our locals and visitors alike take pride in the quality of the water here in Haywood County NC. The agriculture, flora/fauna, wildlife, breweries and more all rely on the quality of our water. Haywood County holds something very precious and rare - water that comes directly from our mountains and nowhere else. We are the only county east of the Mississippi River with headwaters that originate within our county lines. The activity of our community impacts other regions downstream and as award winning author Wendell Berry once said, “Do unto those downstream as you would have those upstream do unto you.” I feel it is our responsibility and duty to safeguard our waterways.

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"Riparian" Episode 309 | Tennessee Uncharted

"Riparian" Episode 309 | Tennessee Uncharted

With 2016’s devastating wildfires and learning about riparian zones feeding Tennessee’s waterways, host Erick Baker discovers that sometimes it takes science to restore faith in our ability to take care of our fair state.

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Haywood Waterways Kids in the Creek

Haywood Waterways Kids in the Creek

Kids in the Creek was created by the Tennessee Valley Authority and brought to Haywood County in 1997. The purpose is to expose 8th grade students to hands-on activities that raise awareness of the importance of clean water and the issues that could degrade water quality. The students rotate among four stations: the EnviroScape watershed model, water chemistry, fish, and benthic macroinvertebrates. At the fish station, the students collect data for a classroom exercise that ties everything together.

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Haywood Waterways Watershed Restoration 2015

Haywood Waterways Watershed Restoration 2015

A look into restoration efforts in Haywood County, NC from the Haywood Waterways Association.

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Saving Southern Appalachian Brook Trout

Saving Southern Appalachian Brook Trout

The Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute (TNACI) is working with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and other partners to save wild populations of Southern Appalachian Brook Trout. This species is Tennessee's only native trout species.

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TN Wild Side - Green Salamander

TN Wild Side - Green Salamander

The Wild Side of Tennessee is full of little creatures that blend into their surroundings, unseen by most. Yet they play very important roles in keeping the balance of nature just right. In this case, we're talking about the green salamander, an animal that makes its home in just a few select places. High on the Cumberland Plateau, deep in the woods, nestled back in the narrow cracks of ages-old rock outcrops is where you'll find this tiny creature. While the green salamander is known for its shyness, Wild Side Guide Alan Griggs shows us how one biology student is discovering just how fascinating it really is.

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TN Wild Side - Conservation Fisheries...Saving Our Fish

TN Wild Side - Conservation Fisheries...Saving Our Fish

Over the years we've encountered some very special people and organizations dedicated to preserving the Wild Side of our great state. All have the common goal of ensuring a more certain future for wildlife and their habitat. That's why we like to tell you about the good work being done by groups like Conservation Fisheries Incorporated. C-F-I is dedicated to preserving the biodiversity of our rivers and streams, often working to save small fish eliminated or badly harmed by pollution or habitat destruction. Wild Side Guide Alan Griggs tells the story of Pat Rakes and J.R. Shute, two University of Tennessee students who took their passion for our natural waters to a new level, in the process creating a better world for us all.

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TN Wild Side - Hiwassee Land Preservation

TN Wild Side - Hiwassee Land Preservation

These days, there are a lot more people trying to live on the same amount of land. That's certainly the case here in Tennessee, where our population is growing faster than the national average. Right now over 6 million people live in our state, a number expected to grow to over 7 million within the next 15 years. Which means the struggle to balance development and preservation is only going to get harder. That's why it's becoming even more important that all of us get involved in helping protect biologically, historically, and visually significant parts of our state. Wild Side Guide Craig Owensby takes us to one such place along the Tennessee River north of Chattanooga, where the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, The Land Trust for Tennessee, and community volunteers worked together to protect a Tennessee treasure.

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TN Wild Side - Sequatchie Caddisfly

TN Wild Side - Sequatchie Caddisfly

Anglers refer to it as "stick bait," most people don't see it, and biologists believe its future is very uncertain. The Sequatchie Caddisfly is one of those small, amazing animals that might be an afterthought to many. In truth, it plays a critical role in the ongoing health of the entire Sequatchie Valley, one of Tennessee's most beautiful natural areas. As humans have intruded into its world, the Sequatchie Caddisfly has lost most of its population and living area. Today, it's confined to a small corner of its original habitat. That's where we find Wild Side Guide Alan Griggs exploring the unusual relationship of a cave, a spring, and a tiny animal that lives there.

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TN Wild Side - Brook Trout Restoration

TN Wild Side - Brook Trout Restoration

The Southern Appalachian Brook Trout is small... so small in fact that a trophy fish is only nine inches long. This beautiful fish, vibrant with shimmery, bright colors is considered a prize catch, largely because the brook trout is a rare and elusive resident of Tennessee waters. It's the only trout native to our state and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and others are trying to make sure it doesn't disappear. Wild Side Guide Alan Griggs takes us to the Cherokee National Forest near Tellico Plains, where some young brook trout are returning home after nearly being wiped out in their mountain habitat.

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TN Wild Side - The Pristine Crayfish

TN Wild Side - The Pristine Crayfish

The clear streams and thick forests of Tennessee’s Cumberland Plateau are home to some of the most unique and diverse wildlife in North America. It's also home to an eighty-year old state park that still attracts a million visitors a year… Fall Creek Falls. Everyone knows about the beauty of the falls, but just as interesting is the animal kingdom found beneath the waters in and near the park… including a rare and elusive crayfish with a colorful name. The Pristine Crayfish might be shy and reclusive but it helps hold the entire Plateau ecosystem together. Wild Side Guide Alan Griggs shows us how researchers are using the crayfish today to plan for tomorrow.

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TN Wild Side - Valley Flame Crayfish

TN Wild Side - Valley Flame Crayfish

It’s believed more species of this little critter are found in Tennessee than any other state. While most of them live in our numerous streams and rivers, some are more at home away from those areas, in moist lands near water…even underground. That’s one reason why the crayfish is such an interesting, unique, and beautiful animal. Crayfish diversity brings researchers here from all over the world to study their habitat and life habits. But Wild Side Guide Alan Griggs found two men who don't have to travel far to follow their lives’ passion, learning as much as they can about crayfish while getting shoulder deep in mud and muck.

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TN Wild Side - Salamander Survey

TN Wild Side - Salamander Survey

They're slithery and slimy and so shy we rarely see them. But to those who know about them they are beautiful sights. That's because salamanders are an indicator of just how healthy their home is. Since their home is the woods and water, that's just about everywhere. In this case, we mean the Bear Hollow Mountain Wildlife Management Area in Franklin County. That's where you'll find Barking Frog Swamp, some hard-working Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency biologists, a slew of salamanders, and Wild Side Guide Alan Griggs, all trying to learn more about these often overlooked creatures.

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TN Wild Side - Buffalo Run

TN Wild Side - Buffalo Run

We've all seen the pictures and heard the thrilling stories of the great buffalo stampedes of the old West. Those involved the massive, furry, four-legged critters that once dominated the Great Plains. But the Buffalo we're talking about today swim in Tellico Reservoir except for a few days in early April each year. That's when thousands of buffalo fish make their spawning runs into nearby Citico Creek. The dark-colored fish quickly turn the creek into a frenzy of splashing water. The fishing's not bad either, as Wild Side Guide Alan Griggs shows us.

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TN Wild Side - Duck River Cleanup

TN Wild Side - Duck River Cleanup

The Duck River is one of the most beautiful and aquatically diverse streams in North America. As it meanders through Middle Tennessee it's used for fishing, boating, and even as a source for drinking water. That's why it's important to keep the Duck clear of trash and natural debris. It's not easy. Uncaring people can easily pollute rivers like the Duck with discarded tires, old boats, and even a shopping cart or two. But thankfully there are volunteers like the ones we met near Columbia, Tennessee whose love for the river includes getting down and dirty. Wild Side Guide Janet Ivey tells us more.

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Southern Salvelinus - Brook Trout Below the Mason-Dixon

Southern Salvelinus - Brook Trout Below the Mason-Dixon

Southern Appalachian Brook Trout are a geographically isolated strain of Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) that are facing a realistic possibility of disappearing. They are a valuable indicator species and the decline in brook trout populations is a reflection of the degradation of our beautiful streams. They are the only native trout (technically a char) to the Eastern United States. Because of the introduction of invasive Rainbow Trout (from the Western US) through state fish stocking programs, they are being out competed and brook trout populations are being even further reduced. Video by BlueBlood.

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Fishy Fragments

Fishy Fragments

These clips are a short snapshot into the many hours of footage captured below the rivers. A longer documentary will be compiled in 2016 including brook trout, stone nest building, colorful darters, and many other interesting species and behaviors. Video by Eric Malone.

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Rivers - More Than Skin Deep

Rivers - More Than Skin Deep

This is a collection of some clips from the National Park Service of some of some of the fish species observed and filmed while snorkeling in several rivers in Southern Appalachia. The diversity that can be found below the surface of these rivers and others throughout North America is unreal. A fish species list is included at the end. Get below the surface and see what you're missing! Video by BlueBlood.

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N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s Whirling Disease Response Plan

N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s Whirling Disease Response Plan

On July 27, 2015, whirling disease was confirmed in rainbow trout collected from Watauga River in Watauga County– the first occurrence of the disease in North Carolina. Whirling disease affects fish in the trout and salmon family with rainbow and brook trout, two species found in North Carolina waters, being the most susceptible. The disease, caused by the microscopic parasite Myxobolus cerebralis, damages cartilage and skeletal tissue in trout, causing them to swim in a whirling motion.

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Coldwater Research Career Connection: North Carolina Triploid Trout Project

Coldwater Research Career Connection: North Carolina Triploid Trout Project

Recently, Coldwater Research Coordinator Jacob Rash with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission spoke with Christine Muth, a biology teacher with the N.C. School of Science and Math, to discuss about stocking triploid trout (sterile) into North Carolina's mountain trout waters. They also discussed careers in fisheries to share with students at the N.C. School of Science and Math. This video provides an overview of how and why the Commission produces these sterile fish. In addition, there is discussion about the field of fisheries science and how folks can become involved. Video by the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics.

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Flexing Their Mussels - Restoration of the Cheoah River

Flexing Their Mussels - Restoration of the Cheoah River

The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's (NCWRC) mussel breeding program helps augment some declining populations and save others from extinction. There are about 17 places in the United States that grow freshwater mussels, but many of those are for research purposes. The Marion facility has held 17 of the approximately 50 species in North Carolina and has propagated seven species to bolster local populations throughout the state. Biologists Rachel Hoch, David Deaton and Peter Lamb are leading the effort in Marion with the help of the NCWRC's Aquatic Wildlife Diversity Program staff.

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Partnering to Connect Citico Creek

Partnering to Connect Citico Creek

Dam removal projects are best done in partnership and one of the best examples is the Upper Citico Creek dam removal project in Tennessee’s Cherokee National Forest highlighted in our short film Connecting Citico Creek. American Rivers teamed up with two federal agencies, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife and the U.S. Forest Service, to achieve the common goal of restoring aquatic habitat. Each partner brought their expertise and resources to the table to produce an efficient, high quality, low cost victory in the Little Tennessee River watershed.

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Spot fin Chub Spawning in Tellico River

Spot fin Chub Spawning in Tellico River

For a little more than 10 years, Conservation Fisheries has been working to re-establish spotfin chub into the Tellico River in eastern Tennessee. These spectacular, turquoise minnows (only the males develop this color and only during summertime spawning), are highly specialized and closely associated with clean, current swept, bedrock habitats. During spawning season, the males become very territorial and stake out crevices in the rocks where the females will ultimately deposit the eggs. While males vigorously defend these territories, they do not provide any direct care to the eggs and larvae. The spotfin chub is federally threatened.

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Citico Creek Buffalo Run

Citico Creek Buffalo Run

At this point, the buffalo, Ictiobus spp. (Probably mixed crowd!) along with some nice big silver redhorse, Moxostoma anisurum, were milling around the creek in pretty good numbers. No spawning events were seen and the schools appeared to be primarily males.... just waiting on the females to arrive! This spectacular event takes place in early April every year in Citico Creek and other numerous other streams in our area. Citico Creek is located on the Cherokee National Forest and is perhaps one of the nicest medium-sized streams in the southern Appalachians! Film by Conservation Fisheries Inc.

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Snorkel Survey in the Tellico River, Cherokee National Forest

Snorkel Survey in the Tellico River, Cherokee National Forest

On August 15, 2013 Conservation Fisheries, Inc. snorkeled the Tellico River in search of some of the imperiled fishes they have been working to restore to this river. This was the first time they ventured out with a new GoPro Black Hero 3. This video captures great numbers of spotfin chubs, Erimonax monachus, Smoky madtoms, Noturus baileyi and Citico darters, Etheostoma sitikuense. Some of the male spotfin chubs were spectacular! Enjoy!

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Floating the Conasauga or Just Another Day at the Office

Floating the Conasauga or Just Another Day at the Office

No, all of our days are not this nice, but this one was a pretty good one! A beautiful July day, not too hot, clear blue sky and pretty good water conditions! The Conasauga is one of our favorite rivers to work! It originates in North Georgia, flows north into Tennessee, then flirts with the state line until finally turning back south into Georgia. Video by Conservation Fisheries Inc.

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Happy Holidays from CFI

Happy Holidays from CFI

Just a short video from the Conservation Fisheries Inc. of some of the beautiful rivers and streams in this part of the world. You may recognize some of them! Happy Holidays from all of us at CFI.

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Hidden Rivers - Preview

Hidden Rivers - Preview

A short preview of Freshwaters Illustrated forthcoming film series on the vibrant yet little-known life of Southern Appalachian Rivers.

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A Deeper Creek - The Watchable Waters of Appalachia

A Deeper Creek - The Watchable Waters of Appalachia

A virtual dive into some of North America's richest rivers, and a fun look at an innovative river snorkeling program that has brought thousands of citizen snorkelers to the vibrant waters of Southern Appalachia. Video by Freshwaters Illustrated.

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The Last Dragons - Protecting Appalachia's Hellbenders

The Last Dragons - Protecting Appalachia's Hellbenders

An intimate glimpse at North America's Eastern Hellbender, an ancient salamander that lives as much in myth as in reality.... and in many waters, myths are all that remain of these sentinel stream-dwellers. Video by Freshwaters Illustrated.

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Bringing Back the Brooks - A Revival of the South’s Trout

Bringing Back the Brooks - A Revival of the South’s Trout

Freshwater Illustrated and the U.S. Forest Service serve a poetic look at a forgotten native of Appalachia, the Southern Appalachian Brook Trout, which is being brought back from the brink… by hand, bucket, and hoof.

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Boone Watershed Partnership

Boone Watershed Partnership

Video by the Tennessee Valley Authority.

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Your Drop Matters

Your Drop Matters

Just forty-five years ago, rivers in the U.S. were so polluted that some actually burned. In response, our country created the Clean Water Act amid other strong environmental legislation. Today, two-thirds of our population has never known a time when clean water wasn’t readily available. Despite improvements in the quality of drinking water, freshwater animals and habitats in the southeastern U.S. remain among the most imperiled on Earth. We have become complacent with institutional protections and haven’t challenged our personal behaviors. How can we solve the freshwater crisis starting in our own backyard? Video by TEDxChattanooga.

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Rescuing Barrens Topminnows During A Drought

Rescuing Barrens Topminnows During A Drought

Dr. Bernie Kuhajda in the field discussing the plight of the endangered Barrens Topminnow as an important population threatened by drought conditions. Video by the Tennessee Aquarium.

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Drought Prompts Endangered Fish Rescue

Drought Prompts Endangered Fish Rescue

The Tennessee Aquarium and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service launched a fish rescue on November 22. The historic drought conditions had reduced the number of locations where the federally endangered Laurel Dace are found. Most of the streams where these brightly colored fish are found have dried up, leaving only a few shallow pools. Only 18 Laurel Dace were recovered and brought back to the Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute for an "ark population," in case this species disappears in the wild. Hopefully these 18 fish will reproduce in the spring allowing scientists an opportunity to bolster the diminishing populations of Laurel Dace in Tennessee.

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Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute - Freshwater Biodiversity

Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute - Freshwater Biodiversity

The warm waters of the southeastern United States are home to an amazing diversity of animals and habitats. The Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Institute (TNACI) works to protect and sustain the region's natural treasures and bring people of all ages closer to nature. Help us celebrate and care for these riches in our backyards.

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Mapping our Rivers in High Definition

Mapping our Rivers in High Definition

A project video produced by Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) for Trutta Consulting LLC High Definition Stream Survey (HDSS) of the Caney Fork River below Center Hill Dam. The project was supported by the Cumberland Chapter of Trout Unlimited, Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and TWRA. We also worked with TWRA fisheries sampling crew to video and GPS their trout surveys that were completed at the same time as the HDSS project. This allows us to see the conditions that the fish were captured and determine what areas of the river are best for trout at different flow conditions.

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Endangered Mussels Released into the Clinch River, Largest Release in Eastern US

Endangered Mussels Released into the Clinch River, Largest Release in Eastern US

Biologists from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF), and partners from Virginia Tech, the Nature Conservancy, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stocked thousands of mussels into the Clinch River, Russell County. The Clinch River has more species of endangered freshwater mussels than any other river in North America. Elementary school students from Cleveland, VA, participated in the event, and learned about the many functions of mussels, including providing habitat for fish, becoming food for many other animals, and filtering and cleaning the water in our streams and rivers. Over 3,500 federally-endangered mussels were produced at the Department's Aquatic Wildlife Conservation Center in Marion, Virginia.

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Protecting the Tennessee River Gorge

Protecting the Tennessee River Gorge

A video documenting why the Tennessee River Gorge Trust's work is necessary.

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Conserving Imperiled Aquatic Species in the UTRB

Conserving Imperiled Aquatic Species in the UTRB

A team of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists, with assistance from U.S. Geological Survey, have developed a collaborative conservation strategy examining cost-effective approaches for efforts to conserve and manage 36 imperiled freshwater fish and mussel species in the 22,360 square-mile Upper Tennessee River Basin.

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Stream Impacts from Water Withdrawals in the Marcellus Shale Region

Stream Impacts from Water Withdrawals in the Marcellus Shale Region

The Appalachian LCC provided a grant to Cornell University Environmental Engineers to study how the region’s surface freshwater supply – and the health of natural systems delivering this resource – have been impacted and may be altered in the coming years under increasing water withdrawals.

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Riparian Restoration Decision Support Tool

Riparian Restoration Decision Support Tool

An innovative riparian planting and restoration decision support tool is now available to the conservation community. This user-friendly tool allows managers and decision-makers to rapidly identify and prioritize areas along the banks of rivers, streams, and lakes for restoration, making these ecosystems more resilient to disturbance and future changes in climate. It will also help the conservation community invest limited conservation dollars wisely, helping to deliver sustainable resources.

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Stream Classification System for the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative

Stream Classification System for the Appalachian Landscape Conservation Cooperative

Stream classification information is essential to develop and implement flow standards and water management recommendations that will sustain aquatic biodiversity. Unfortunately, standardized information was lacking for the Appalachian landscape. The goal of this project was to develop a state-based, consistent stream classification system for aquatic ecosystems in the region. Unifying state-based stream classifications into a single consistent system, principal investigators at The Nature Conservancy developed a hierarchical classification system and map for stream and river systems for the Appalachian LCC that represents the region’s natural flowing aquatic habitats.

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Riparian Restoration to Promote Climate Change Resilience in Eastern U.S. Streams

Riparian Restoration to Promote Climate Change Resilience in Eastern U.S. Streams

This presentation from Jason Coombs of the University of Massachusetts provides an update to the Steering Committee on this Appalachian LCC funded research project. The Riparian Restoration to Promote Climate Change Resilience in Eastern U.S. Streams is developing and implementing a user-friendly web-based tool to identify priority areas for riparian restoration in the context of predicted climate change at the appropriate scale needed by practitioners. A ‘shovel ready’ prioritization tool for managers facing immediate on-the-ground decisions will be developed. Then research will link directly to ongoing and future stream flow, temperature, and biological response modeling projects and decision support tools.

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A bold plan: The story of WVU and the salvation of a historic home for brook trout

A bold plan: The story of WVU and the salvation of a historic home for brook trout

A team at WVU has been working for years with the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources to examine all of the factors that led to warmer temperatures, a wider and shallower stream and other changes that over time threatened the brook trout productivity of this important natural and economic resource.

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