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Wildland Fire Spatial Data

Forest Change, Loss 2000-2012, Northeast

Forest Change, Loss 2000-2012, Northeast

This dataset represents forest loss during the period 2000-2012, defined as a stand-replacement disturbance, or a change from a forest to non-forest state, entirely within the study period, for the Northeast region including Canada. Data was encoded as either 1 (loss) or 0 (no loss). The Northeast data from the Global Forest Change dataset was acquired as 10x10 degree tiles, consisting of seven files per tile. All files contained unsigned 8-bit values and have a spatial resolution of 1 arc-second per pixel, or approximately 30 meters per pixel at the equator. The data was then mosaicked and clipped to the Northeast region including the North Atlantic LCC boundary in Canada. The data are results from a time-series analysis of 654,178 Landsat 7 ETM+ images in characterizing global forest extent and change from 2000 through 2012. For additional information about these results, please see the associated journal article (Hansen et al., Science 2013).

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Forest Change Gain, 2000-2012, Northeast

Forest Change Gain, 2000-2012, Northeast

This dataset represents forest gain during the period 2000-2012, defined as the inverse of loss, or a non-forest to forest change, entirely within the study period, for the Northeast region including Canada. Data was encoded as either 1 (gain) or 0 (no gain). The Northeast data from the Global Forest Change dataset was acquired as 10x10 degree tiles, consisting of seven files per tile. All files contained unsigned 8-bit values and have a spatial resolution of 1 arc-second per pixel, or approximately 30 meters per pixel at the equator. The data was then mosaicked and clipped to the Northeast region including the North Atlantic LCC boundary in Canada. The data are results from a time-series analysis of 654,178 Landsat 7 ETM+ images in characterizing global forest extent and change from 2000 through 2012. For additional information about these results, please see the associated journal article (Hansen et al., Science 2013).

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Forest Above-ground Biomass, 2012, Northeast

Forest Above-ground Biomass, 2012, Northeast

This dataset measures the total amount of above-ground live biomass in forested systems, which is an important attribute of forested communites and an indicator of successional development, and an important habitat attribute for many forest-associated wildlife species. The dataset is derived from a combination of remote sensing products derived from multi-temporal Landsat TM data and Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) plot data and forest succession models derived from FIA plot data. It is expected this dataset will be useful for distinguishing early successional from mature forests as they existed in approximately 2012. Units are in kilograms/meters squared times 10.

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DSLland, Version 3, Northeast

DSLland, Version 3, Northeast

This dataset represents terrestrial and wetland ecological systems of the Northeast (based on NatureServe's Ecological Systems Classifications) combined with human-modified land types such as roads and agriculture. It is a substantial revision of the map of the Northeast Terrestrial Wildlife Habitat Classification System (developed by The Nature Conservancy and the northeastern state wildlife agencies) that reflect newer information on development, wetlands, and streams.

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Probability of Development

Probability of Development

This dataset represents the integrated probability of development between 2010-2080 based on a custom urban growth model that accounts for the type (low intensity, medium intensity and high intensity), amount and spatial pattern of development. This index represents the probability of development occurring sometime between 2010 and 2080 at the 30 m cell level. The projected amount of development in an area is downscaled from county level forecasts based on a U.S. Forest Service 2010 Resources Planning Act (RPA) assessment. The type and pattern of development is based on models of historical development and is influenced by factors such as geophysical conditions (e.g., slope, proximity to open water), existing secured lands, and proximity to roads and urban centers.

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Weighted Index of Ecological Integrity

Weighted Index of Ecological Integrity

This dataset represents the weighted index of ecological integrity (IEI), which is a measure of relative intactness (i.e., freedom from human modifications and disturbance) and resiliency to environmental change (e.g., as caused by disturbance and climate change). Raw IEI is a composite index derived from 19 different landscape metrics that measure different aspects of intactness and resiliency. For the derivation of this layer, raw IEI is (quantile) scaled by ecological system and HUC6 watershed so that the poorest cell of each ecological system gets a 0 and the best gets a 1 within each watershed. In the layer provided here, scaled IEI has been modified to reflect weights assigned to each ecological system by the planning team, such that the final index gives more emphasis to certain terrestrial and wetland ecological systems deemed more vulnerable or in greater need of conservation (e.g., wetlands, alpine, boreal upland forest). Note that weights were not applied to aquatic systems. Thus, Aquatic Index of Ecological Integrity, which is provided for convenience in displaying the results of the aquatic conservation design but is otherwise equivalent to IEI except that it only has values for aquatic cells (all non-aquatic cells are set to nodata), is technically unweighted IEI. Weighted IEI is a major component of the terrestrial and aquatic core area selection indices and thus the terrestrial and aquatic network of core areas.

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